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Photo Math solving math equations in a snap

 

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PHOTO BY REBECCA PILOZO-MELARA

A new mobile app is solving math equations in a snap.

Photo Math is an app to allow users to solve math equations by taking a picture of the problem with their mobile device. Photo Math currently can’t identify hand written expressions and can only read clean text equations. Aside from having an equation solved, one is able to see a step-by-step solving formula.Apps such as this are already being used at the Humber Math Centre to cater to all learning styles.

“Technology intrigues students,” said Humber Business math teacher and co-op student Jessica Huang. “It shows them that you can use different applications and technology to help you. It’s a different way of learning (in which) you can try and gauge your own learning.”

Cameron Redsell-Montgomerie, coordinator at the Humber Math Centre says, “I think this is  teaching faculty how to teach math and that they can’t get away with just calculations.” Despite the app being unique with its capturing and solving feature, Redsell-Montgomerie adds that users are limited, and current applications such as Wolfram Alpha, are already catering to the everyday user by instantly providing answers to questions ranging from math to statistics.“Once the app can read hand written equations, it’ll have the potential to do marvellous things.”

Huang said her concern with applications like Photo Math is their potential to limit or restrict student learning. “Yes an app is great. It’ll tell you the answer right away where you take a picture of it…but you’re not understanding why it’s happening. You’re not the brains behind the operation, the software is,” she said.

Although concerns have been raised about whether students may give up on further refining their mathematical skills, Jonathan Piché, first-year Humber International Business student, doesn’t believe Photo Math is hurting students, but is a beneficial tool. Piché said the way the app guides users through the equation process is truly helpful and he believes educational apps can help students save money on tutors. “I wouldn’t use it for every equation but if I was stuck on a question I would. I wouldn’t use it as a reliable source,” Piché said.

The free app is available on the Apple app store, Windows Store, and Google Play; the official Android app is set to launch early 2015.

Check out the video below to see how the mobile app works in action.

 

 

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Information sessions prepare students for upcoming Venture Seed competition

The Humber Launch prepares students for upcoming New Venture Seed Fund (NVSF) competition at information sessions.

The NVSF information sessions are designed to teach applicants how to write business plans and prepare applicants for the final NVSF competition. The fourth annual NVSF competition gives applicants an opportunity to share their business plan with a final prize of $10,000 that can only go towards the applicants new business. Associate Dean of Humber’s business school, Peter Madott said, “These sessions are to help people understand the submission process on how to develop a business plan in order to compete in the contest.” Humber college business professor and entrepreneur advocate, Tony Gifford said, “This money can go towards things for their business such as a business certificate.”

To be eligible to partake in these sessions and competition, one has to be a full time Humber student who is completing or expected to graduate during January 1, to Aug. 2015. An early submission deadline is on November 17 with a chance to win an iPad followed by a final deadline on December 5 at 4 p.m. The winner of the NVSF competition will be announced on January 9.

On Oct. 27 and 28, the sessions took place in the Blue room of Humber College’s Lakshore campus. On Oct. 39, the final day of the NVSF sessions, the event took place in room L3002/3005. “I think we had multiple dates to accommodate the schedule of many students and peoples schedules,” Cherun said. NVSF sessions will be taking place Nov. 3, in room B101 and room C109, on Nov. 4, and 6 at 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

The Humber Launch is an opportunity for aspiring entrepreneurs to turn ideas into a business. Members of the Humber Launch are provided with resources and business insight as they start up. Maddot says, “ whether you win (NVSF) or not, Humber Launch is there to help mentor and coach people who are really trying to start a business.”

The Humber Launch is open to current Humber students, alumni’s, and locals who have a current business they are passionate to start. Program assistant of the Humber Launch, Bram Cherun says students from all programs are welcome to become a part of The Humber Launch, and adds, “There’s no cost to become a member, we just ask them for their time, and dedication.”

Adobe apps make projects mobile

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PHOTO BY REBECCA PILOZO

The latest apps released by Adobe are expected to make it easier for users to get their work done on the go.

Adobe launched four categories of apps that correspond in its Creative Cloud service. Kevin Brandon, coordinator of the graphic design program Humber College has been an Adobe program user since 1988 and said, “Adobe is making mobile apps more powerful, and productive. It is so efficient to have the ability to have creative tools with you at all times.” He explains that the new Adobe apps integrate with the user’s desktop counter part applications and adds, “With the release of these apps Adobe hooks you into their month/yearly subscription plan to their Adobe Creative Cloud, this subscription allows you a great opportunity to create and access your design assets in both the mobile apps and your desktop applications.”

Vincent Dylan Defreitas, 21, second year Humber creative photography student enjoys now having the mobile accessibility to the adobe photo apps which help him complete his work. Defreitas mentions that he is able to accomplish just as much on the app as he can on a desktop and says, “ I use all the adobe programs for my course load and it makes it a lot easier to be able to access it (photos.) If I’m not stationary at my desk I can continue my work wherever I am, and get stuff done a lot quicker.”

Erin Riley, 43, part time Humber basic photography instructor believes Adobe could be recognizing their users demanding industry where time is important. “It (Adobe Photoshop mobile app) allows you to make images on the fly. Clients need stuff fast and sometimes you don’t have the time to pull out your laptop,” said Riley.

Although the series of apps may provide great accessibility to one’s work, Riley does not believe it can replace the programs being used on a desktop and said, “At the end of the day you want your work to look good and use tools to allow you to enhance your work.”